Sunday 2 June

Sunday 2 June

9th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Gospel – Mark 2:23-3:6

“Is it against the law on the sabbath day to do good, or to do evil”. The answer is very clear. To do good on sabbath is not against the law. With this statement, Jesus is teaching us that each law must a way to do good. The man with a withered hand is sitting among the people. Jesus is asking him to change his position, “Stand up out in the middle”. This man who has a problem must stand up out in the middle of the community because if we are not seeking a solution for his problem, but we are observing the day of the Lord, it seems meaningless. Without being sensitive to the problems of others, our pious celebrations become meaningless. When we can put the problems of others in the middle of our thoughts and try to do the good we can do, we are following Jesus. But when we are obstinate like the Pharisees, we will have to out from the presence of Jesus. “The Pharisees went out and at once began to plot with the Herodians against him, discussing how to destroy him.”. Let’s reflect: Am I sensitive to the problems of others and try to do good to remain in the presence of the Lord?

Saturday 1 June

Saturday 1 June

Saint Justin, Martyr
Saturday of week 8 in Ordinary Time
Gospel – Matthew 5:13-19
“In the same way your light must shine in the sight of men, so that, seeing your good works, they may give the praise to your Father in heaven”. It’s the nature of the light to shine and to illuminate. Jesus is comparing his disciples to light. “You are the light of the world”. And this light must shine before others. And Jesus also explains how the light must shine. We must shine through our good works. Our good words are the rays of light. Good words in all circumstances. Here the comparison with the light is very important. Good works from us must be as accessories. Good works from us must be our nature. Not some good works during the day, or occasionally. Everything we do must be an extension of the good in us as disciples of Jesus Christ. His light in us. His love in us. We must continuously transmit that light through us, through our good works constantly. Then only we can fulfill our vocation as light, by being light in the life of others. Let’s us reflect: Do I recognize my vocation as light in my daily life?

Friday 31 May

Friday 31 May

The Visitation of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Feast

Gospel – Luke 1:39-56

“My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord and my spirit exults in God my saviour”. Today we are celebrating the Feast that commemorates the visit of the Virgin Mary to her cousin Elizabeth, as described in the Gospel of Luke. The feast highlights the humility, charity, and joy of the Virgin Mary as she visits Elizabeth to assist her during her pregnancy. The feast emphasises the faith of Mother Mary in the word of the Angel at Annunciation, her joy in the encounter with Elizabeth and her humility and charity in assisting Elizabeth during her pregnancy. It also celebrates the sanctification of John the Baptist in Elizabeth’s womb and the recognition of Jesus’ presence by John even before his birth. The encounter between Mary and Elizabeth is marked by profound joy, as evidenced by the leaping of John the Baptist in Elizabeth’s womb and Mary’s hymn of praise. Along with the humility of Mother Mary and her spirit of service, three months with Elizabeth, we are called to meditate with the recognition of Jesus’ divine nature even in the womb, as acknowledged by John the Baptist and Elizabeth. The underlying truth is that when Jesus is present in us, we will be humble and when we are humble our encounters will become joyful. Let’s reflect: Do I succeed in transmitting the joy of the presence of Jesus in us to those whom I encounter?

Thursday 30 May

Thursday 30 May

The Most Holy Body and Blood of Christ – Solemnity

Gospel – Mark 14:12-16,​22-26

Today we are celebrating the Feast of Corpus Christi. It’s a liturgical solemnity celebrating the Real presence of Christ in the Eucharist. This feast invites us to reflect deeply on the gift of the Eucharist, a sacrament that nourishes our souls, strengthens our faith, and unites us as the body of Christ. “Take it,’ he said ‘this is my body.’ Then he took a cup, and when he had returned thanks he gave it to them, and all drank from it, and he said to them, ‘This is my blood, the blood of the covenant, which is to be poured out for many”. These words remind us that the Eucharist is not just a symbol but the actual body and blood of Christ, given for us. It is through the Eucharist that we encounter Jesus in a unique and intimate way, receiving His life and love, and being transformed by that. The Eucharist is a mystery that surpasses our human understanding, yet it is a mystery in which we participate with our life. In the simple elements of bread and wine, Christ is truly present, offering Himself to us. This gift is a testament to God’s immense love for us, a love that knows no bounds and seeks all means to make us closer to Him. Each time we celebrate the Eucharist, we are not merely recalling an event from the past but participating in the eternal sacrifice of Christ, made present to us here and now. When we receive the body and blood of Christ, we are united not only with Jesus but also with one another. We become the body of Christ, called to live out His love in the world. This unity challenges us to look beyond our individual concerns and embrace our brothers and sisters with compassion and solidarity. Let’s reflect: How much I value the gift of the real presence of Jesus Christ in the Eucharist?

Wednesday 29 May

Wednesday 29 May

Wednesday of week 8 in Ordinary Time

Saint Paul VI, Pope

Gospel – Mark 10:32-45

“anyone who wants to become great among you must be your servant, and anyone who wants to be first among you must be slave to all. For the Son of Man himself did not come to be served but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many”. Jesus came to serve and to give his life as a ransom for many. So, if we want to follow Jesus, we also must become servants. Only in becoming a servant, you become first in giving the love of God manifested in Jesus. True greatness comes not from being served, but from serving others. Jesus’ words challenge conventional notions of power and greatness. He overturns the idea that being first or great means having authority or being served by others. Instead, He presents a radical vision where the greatest among us are those who serve others. This servant discipleship is important where disciples prioritize the needs of others, showing humility, compassion, and selflessness. By adopting a servant’s heart, we align ourselves more closely with the teachings and life of Jesus, experiencing a deeper sense of purpose and fulfillment. This path of service allows us to share God’s love in tangible ways, making a meaningful impact in the lives of others. Let’s reflect: What am I doing to grow myself in a servant’s heart?

Tuesday 28 May

Tuesday 28 May

Tuesday of week 8 in Ordinary Time

Gospel – Mark 10:28-31

“Many who are first will be last, and the last first”. This is a disturbing declaration of Jesus because it goes against the common logic. The logic of success. But in the vision of Jesus, it’s different. The success is not measured with position in the line but with the relationship with Him. In the context of Jesus’ vision, success is redefined. It’s not about one’s rank, wealth, or power, but rather about one’s relationship with Him and with others. Those who seem insignificant in worldly terms may hold the greatest value in the eyes of God because of their relationship with Jesus and with the those who are dear to Jesus. Conversely, those who are considered important or successful by societal standards may find themselves lacking in what truly matters in the kingdom of God. This teaching encourages a shift in focus from external achievements to inner virtues and from self-centred ambitions to selfless service. It invites us to look beyond the surface and to cultivate a deep, meaningful connection with God and with those in need around us. Evangelization is not a race to win but a mission to love. This perspective can be both challenging and liberating, as it calls for a re-evaluation of what it means to live a successful and fulfilling apostolic life. Let’s reflect: How much importance I give to success according to societal standards, ignoring the importance of relationship to Jesus?